myScience

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  • Featured Project: National Map Corps

  • Featured Project: Nature's Notebook

  • Featured Project: North American Breeding Bird Survey

  • Featured Project: Did You See It?

  • Featured Project: Did You Feel It?

    

Featured Projects


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added: 09/23/2013 updated: 11/14/2013

Did You Feel It?

Did You Feel It? (DYFI) web site is intended to tap the abundant information available about earthquakes from the people who actually experience them. By taking advantage of the vast numbers of Internet users, we can get a more complete description of what people experienced, the effects of the earthquake, and the extent of damage, than traditional ways of gathering felt information. And best of all, with your help we can do so almost instantly. Not only will you add valuable information on the extent of ground shaking and damage, but in the process we hope you will learn more about how other communities fared and gain a greater understanding of the effects of earthquakes.

added: 09/23/2013 updated: 11/14/2013

Nature's Notebook: A project of the USA National Phenology Network

Nature's Notebook gathers information on plant and animal phenology across the U.S. to be used for decision-making on local, national and global scales to ensure the continued vitality of our environment. Scientists alone cannot collect enough data: They need your help. Join more than 6,000 other naturalists across the nation in taking the pulse of our planet. You'll use scientifically-vetted observation guidelines, developed for over 900 species, to ensure data are useful to researchers and decision-makers.

added: 09/09/2013 updated: 11/06/2014
Updated!

North American Breeding Bird Survey

The North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) is an international avian population monitoring program that provides scientifically credible measures of the status and trends of North American bird populations at continental and regional scales to inform biologically sound conservation and management actions. The primary products of the BBS are population count data, trend estimates and relative abundance estimates for more than 400 bird species found in the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico, which are used, along with other indicators, by Federal, State and private entities to assess and set avian conservation priorities, inform model-based conservation planning, support research investigating underlying variation in bird populations, and provide count data for estimating species’ population sizes. Established in 1966 and ongoing, the BBS relies primarily on volunteer participants, highly skilled in avian identification, to collect annual population data along randomly established roadside routes using a rigorous and standardized sampling protocol. Each year approximately 3000 of the more than 4000 routes scattered throughout the continental U.S., Canada, and northern Mexico are sampled. The BBS is jointly coordinated by the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service, and since 2007, the Mexican National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity.

added: 09/20/2013 updated: 12/23/2013

Report a landslide

Every year, landslides cost the nation 1 to 2 billion dollars in damage. Falling rocks, mud, and debris flows are one of the most common and sometimes deadly hazards faced by all U.S. citizens, yet there is still a lot we do not know about how and why they happen. Now, scientists at the USGS are asking the public to help them track landslides to better understand how to protect lives and property. "Report a landslide" is a website developed by the USGS Landslide Hazards Program that asks anyone who saw a landslide anywhere in the country to report their observations. These observations will build a much larger and more complete database that will help scientists gain a clearer picture of how landslides affect the entire United States.

added: 09/23/2013 updated: 11/01/2013

The National Map Corps

The mapping crowd-sourcing program, known as The National Map Corps, encourages citizens to collect structures data by adding new features, removing obsolete points, and correcting existing data for The National Map database. If you have access to the Internet and are willing to dedicate some time editing map data we hope you will consider participating! Volunteers can now contribute data for all 50 states! You do not need to live in available states to participate.

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All projects in the myScience directory are listed below the advanced search form.
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All Projects


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Alaska Volcano Observatory Citizen Network Ash Collection and Observation Program

Alaska has an abundance of active volcanoes, averaging two eruptions a year. Citizens in Alaskan communities can now go online and report their observations of volcanic ash through the Is Ash Falling? system, which was developed by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory (AVO). Ash fall reports are shared with the National Weather Service (NWS) to track where an ash plume is headed and to guide them in making official statements and advisories about ash fallout onto the landscape. Citizens are also encouraged to collect ash samples and send them to AVO. With your help, volcano scientists can greatly expand their sampling of ash deposits.

    added: 09/23/2013 updated: 09/16/2014

CrowdHydrology

The CrowdHydrology mission is to create freely available data on stream stage in a simple and inexpensive way. We do this through the use of "crowd sourcing" which means we gather information on stream stage (water levels) from anyone willing to send us a text message of the water levels at their local stream. These data are then available for anyone to then use from Universities to Elementary schools.

    added: 09/23/2013 updated: 10/30/2013

DC/Baltimore Cricket Crawl

A call to Citizen Scientists, Artists, Naturalists and Scientists to join an annual Cricket Crawl for an evening sound census of the late summer crickets and katydids singing throughout the Baltimore/DC metro areas. We hope to document 8 target species in our area and map their distribution. Why? In order to know how these populations are changing we need to start listening for them.

    added: 09/23/2013 updated: 11/14/2013

Did You Feel It?

Did You Feel It? (DYFI) web site is intended to tap the abundant information available about earthquakes from the people who actually experience them. By taking advantage of the vast numbers of Internet users, we can get a more complete description of what people experienced, the effects of the earthquake, and the extent of damage, than traditional ways of gathering felt information. And best of all, with your help we can do so almost instantly. Not only will you add valuable information on the extent of ground shaking and damage, but in the process we hope you will learn more about how other communities fared and gain a greater understanding of the effects of earthquakes.

    added: 09/15/2014 updated: 09/16/2014

iCoast - Did the Coast Change?

The USGS “iCoast – Did the Coast Change?” web application asks volunteers to identify changes to the coast by comparing and tagging aerial photographs taken before and after storms. Your contributions help USGS scientists improve the accuracy of USGS coastal change prediction models and vulnerability assessments that support pre-storm planning and post-storm rescue, recovery, and mitigation efforts. It is also a great educational tool for teaching students and even coastal residents about coastal hazards.

    added: 09/23/2013 updated: 11/14/2013

Nature's Notebook: A project of the USA National Phenology Network

Nature's Notebook gathers information on plant and animal phenology across the U.S. to be used for decision-making on local, national and global scales to ensure the continued vitality of our environment. Scientists alone cannot collect enough data: They need your help. Join more than 6,000 other naturalists across the nation in taking the pulse of our planet. You'll use scientifically-vetted observation guidelines, developed for over 900 species, to ensure data are useful to researchers and decision-makers.

    added: 09/20/2013 updated: 10/31/2013

Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) Online Sighting Report System

This project provides a central repository for spatially referenced bio-geographic accounts of non-indigenous aquatic species in the USA. It includes verified occurrences, maps, and species pages for freshwater non-indigenous aquatic animal species. Citizens can report a non-native species via an online reporting form.

    added: 09/20/2013 updated: 11/07/2013

North American Bird Phenology Program

The North American Bird Phenology Program, part of the USA-National Phenology Network, was a network of volunteer observers who recorded information on first arrival dates, maximum abundance, and departure dates of migratory birds across North America. Active between 1880 and 1970, the program was coordinated by the Federal government and sponsored by the American Ornithologists' Union. It exists now as a historic collection of six million migration card observations, illuminating almost a century of migration patterns and population status of birds. Today, in an innovative project to curate the data and make them publicly available, the records are being scanned and placed on the internet, where volunteers worldwide transcribe these records and add them into a database for analysis.

    added: 09/09/2013 updated: 11/06/2014
Updated!

North American Breeding Bird Survey

The North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) is an international avian population monitoring program that provides scientifically credible measures of the status and trends of North American bird populations at continental and regional scales to inform biologically sound conservation and management actions. The primary products of the BBS are population count data, trend estimates and relative abundance estimates for more than 400 bird species found in the U.S.A., Canada and Mexico, which are used, along with other indicators, by Federal, State and private entities to assess and set avian conservation priorities, inform model-based conservation planning, support research investigating underlying variation in bird populations, and provide count data for estimating species’ population sizes. Established in 1966 and ongoing, the BBS relies primarily on volunteer participants, highly skilled in avian identification, to collect annual population data along randomly established roadside routes using a rigorous and standardized sampling protocol. Each year approximately 3000 of the more than 4000 routes scattered throughout the continental U.S., Canada, and northern Mexico are sampled. The BBS is jointly coordinated by the USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Environment Canada’s Canadian Wildlife Service, and since 2007, the Mexican National Commission for the Knowledge and Use of Biodiversity.

    added: 09/20/2013 updated: 10/30/2013

NYC Cricket Crawl

The Cricket and Katydid Crawl of New York City and surrounds is a citizen science pilot project in which participants venture out between dusk and midnight to locations of their choosing throughout the New York City metro area to listen for the calls of crickets and katydids and document their observations. We are now looking for a coordinator for the region as part of a North American network of such projects. Contact Sam Droege sdroege@usgs.gov

About myScience


The Challenge

  • How can the USGS best provide ways for the public to discover opportunities for participation in our scientific research?
  • What citizen science projects are currently active within the USGS?
  • How do project leaders increase public engagement in and awareness of their citizen science projects?

The myScience public engagement and project discovery application addresses these questions by providing unprecedented public access to USGS citizen-science project information. The application is named after a successful citizen-science collaboration between Microsoft and Stanford University. For the first time, myScience enables open access to information about projects in which the USGS has a collaborative role.

myScience meets the need for an innovative tool and resource to increase public engagement in and awareness of existing USGS citizen-science projects. It also serves to build a community of practice among USGS scientists who engage or would like to engage the public in their scientific research. Supporting the Department of Interior's Science Technology and Math (STEM) Education and Employment Pathways Strategic Plan, it provides access to youth learning opportunities by linking all age groups with science programs, fostering civic interest in the natural world and promoting stewardship.

myScience was developed with support from the USGS Community for Data Integration.